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Q:

I would like to join the TRF, how do I go about it?

A:

First find your nearest group. This page contains contact information for all TRF groups. Then use our online secure payment with paypal to join us.


Q :

Can I ride my motorcycle on bridleways or footpaths ?

A :

No you cannot ride on Footpaths or Bridleways.  [click here] to see where you can ride your motorcycle


Q :

I've bought a motorcycle but I'm not old enough to hold a licence, can I still ride on Green Roads ?

A :No. You and your motorcycle must be 'road legal', Green Roads are legally roads. Besides how are you going to get to them ?

Q :

I've got a motorcrosser, what would I need to do to get it road legal, so I can ride it on Green Roads ?

A :To be frank, you'd be better off getting a proper trail bike. The costs and hassle involved would not make it worth while. MX'ers are generally very 'peaky' in thier power delivery, trail riding requires bottom end 'grunt' rather than out right power. Then there is the trouble of getting it registered with DVLA, not to mention insurance & MOT hassles.

Q :

I've got a road legal quad, can I join the TRF ?

A :

Yes, you are welcome to join the TRF as long as you and your quad are road legal and you agree to abide by the Code of conduct.
[click here to join]


Q :

I want to go 'off-roading', where are the Green Roads near me ?

A :Firstly, Trail Riding is not 'off-road', the routes we use are legally roads. Secondly, your local TRF group will know, get in touch or go to a meeting. All TRF group's details can be found here

Q :

Where can I buy a map of Green Roads ?

A :You can't, although byways are shown on Ordnance Survey maps that can be purchased from W.H.Smith or similar large high street outlets. Join your nearest TRF group and go out on runs with them, you'll soon learn where they are.

Q :

Why are there no TRF groups in Scotland, Northen Ireland or Eire?

A :Unfortunately Scotland has a different legal system which we have little knowledge of and therefore can not offer advice on. The same applies to Northen Ireland and Eire.

Q :

How do I identify Rights of Way?

A :

In England and Wales public rights of way should be clearly marked at the points where they begin and end.
Lokk out for:

Footpath
Bridleway
Byway
Restricted Byway
UCR


Q :

How do I get a 'key' for Trailwise ?

A :

Anyone that is waiting for a Registration Key to access the Trailwise (formerly Wayfinder) website: Please email direct to the Membership Secretary, Debbie [ This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ] with your surname, postcode and membership number - The Membership Secretary can then mail you back the relevant information to access the site. (please bear in mind Debbie work shifts so may not reply immediately)


Q:

Which public rights of way can I use for walking?

A:

All Public Rights of Way can be accessed on foot where identified correctly ensuring that the correct route is followed.  Straying of the defined route is trespassing.
Walkers should always be aware that if walking on bridleways, they may meet horses and cyclists, if walking on Byways and UCR's they may meet MOTORISED VEHICLES and horse drawn carriages.
Courtesy should be shown for other user groups.  The countryside is there for all to enjoy.
If walkers do not wish to experience meeting horses, cyclists, motorised vehicles and horse and carriage, then it is best to avoid routes other than Footpaths, which comprise a very high percentage of the available Public Rights of Way network.


Q:

Which Public rights of way can I use for Horse Riding?

A:

Horse Riders can access Bridleways, Byways UCR's and Restricted Byways, but are not allowed on Footpaths.  Horse riders should be aware if riding on Byways and UCR's that they may meet MOTORISED VEHICLES.
If you do not wish to meet Motorised Vehicles then utilise the network of Bridleways and Restricted Byways where you will only meet walkers and pedal cyclists.
Responsible Motorised Vehicle users will stop for you and switch off their engines.  It is sensible to indicate if you have a nervous horse as responsible vehicle users will take account of that and allow you to calm the horse and safely pass by.


Q:

Where can I ride my Motorcycle?

A:

There are many motorcyclists who ride machines designed to be ridden on unsurfaced roads (Lanes, Green Lanes, Tracks etc).
Provided they are Road registered, Taxed, Insured and MOT'd and the rider has a current valid drivers licence, then motorcycles can be ridden on Byways and UCR's.
Motorcycles may NOT be ridden on Footpaths, Bridleways or Restricted Byways.
Motorcyclists should be aware of other users groups and be prepared to slow down, stop and switch off engines as required.
Most countryside users do not have any issues with vehicle users, provided courtesy is shown.


Q:

What should I do if I meet another user who I do not think has the right to be there?

A:

Users of Public Rights of Way need to be aware of which can be used by who.  If you meet someone who you think should not be there, you should simply and politely make your observation to them.  If they are a responsible countryside user then they should be happy to talk to you.  If they are not then do not seek a confrontation, let them continue on their way and then later speak to your local Rights of Way department at the council or contact the local police with the details.  Be sure to check the status of the Right of Way first, in case it is you that is wrong.
NO ONE other than a uniformed police officer has the right to stop and question anyone and definately does not have the right to use any force to do so.
The majority of Public Rights of Way users are responsible and polite - Conflict is not neccessary. 


  
  



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